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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
for children, a city, a country at war with itself. what kind of things are these little girls seeing beyond the school gates? >> translator: we as educators don't support one side or the other. our concern is for the child to learn. so we keep the school open and help with their fears. we can't do as much as before, but the key thing is to try to deal with their anxiety. >> reporter: up, down, left, right, two, three, four. out in the playground it's a p-e lesson. exercises including running to the wall, touching it and running back. here, the running's for fun, but beyond the school walls, a shell or mortar can land anywhere any time, running could be a matter of life and death. for obvious reasons the killing of small children and teachers in and around school buildings is pretty near the top of the news agenda at the moment. so it is in this educational district and the one next door alone in the past two weeks, 35 small children and two teach verse been killed. the security building next to the school was car bombed recently, leaving a staff candid about the problems they face here. >>
are everywhere. we want to you remember this -- just last month, this new york city police officer made news by offering a homeless man in times square a pair of boots on a cold night. or this -- a tennessee boy who helped his brother in a wheelchair compete in a triathlon, helping him achieve his dream to cross a finish line. >>> or the football team at one arizona high school who protected this fresh han with special needs from bullies. and just this weekend, there's a texas cop who wrapped $100 bill in a traffic ticket he gave to one struggling dad. just one of the encouraging moments of humanity we have seen this year. it's important to keep in mind there's still good in the world even when tragic things happen. >>> what could prompt one to carry out such horrific acts, many questions will never be answered. we'll talk with an expert in criminal behavior. erin burnett joins us, next. sen. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male annou
and it doesn't belong on the streets of our city and it doesn't belong in a place where a 20-year-old like this particular 20-year-old could get a hold of it and do what he did. this makes me very angry. >> there was a federal assault weapons ban, it expired in 2004. >> those who knew adam lanza said he loved video games. he was a member of the school's tech club in high school. members of the tech club played the computer video games including the one you're looking at "starcraft" you command armies to defeat your opponents. is there a link between violent video games and aggressive behavior? craig anderson is a professor at iowa state university and director of the center for the study of violence and joins us from ames, iowa. welcome, sir. >> thank you, happy to be here, carol. >> glad to have you here. in your mind is there a connection between violent video game and violence in real life? >> yes, there is. every major scientific society that has studied the question has come to the same answer, the maeamerican medical association the american psychological association, the national so
with any fears that the children may have? dr. charles sew city a psychiatrist and medical director for the los angeles county department of children and family services. dr. sophie, thanks very much for coming in. so what's the most important thing parents can say or do to alleviate any concerns for these young kids? >> make sure their emotional responses are intact and their children don't become frightened. you need to have that discussion. talk to the children, ask them what they know. if they don't know anything, give them an education what happened. no gory details and then listen. the key is to listen to your children and then answer age appropriate lit questions. but answers less never sex more information and listen to your children. > how do parents make sure they don't project their own fears onto the kids? >> i think there's several ways this parents can protect themselves and not worry that they are going to put onto their children their own fears and concerns and these by talking to each other as parents, talking to other parents and making sure that they have at least
also saw the calendar as an opportunity. he opened a boutique hotel in the closest city. >> judging by a number of hotels being built in town and operators being created, we can tell there's a lot of expectation, a few hotels are giving discounts because it's the end of the world. >> some mayans have complained about the exploitation of their culture. but she says they are in the minority. >> what i have seen is they're very happy. they see the benefit because the nice thing about the tourism is that it shares the benefit with everyone. >> others disagree. alphonso runs tours to mayan communities and says the tourist dollars are going elsewhere. >> most of the money is spent in transportation, and they don't own taxes, hotels, restaurants, and here they don't have those services yet. >> yet may be the word. hotels across the five mayan states are nearly sold out. the hope is that interest in the culture is long-term. assuming everybody survives december 21st. >> nick, you still there? i was just -- i was just waiting -- >> reporter: basically we're looki ining at a situation tomo wh
to themselves, how could this happen in our little community here, a small city, small town, 20,000 people, not far from dan bury, as i walk around, people don't know what to say. >> yeah. and i mean, this is the kind of -- i mean a parent never gets over the loss of a child, especially to have it around the holidays and each year that remainder around this time, when everyone else is celebrating. i think people in this community will never forget that and each holiday a remembrance of those whose lives were lost. >> i got in front of me here, this is painful if you look at this. this is the list of the victims the state police released -- >> horrific. >> the 30 people -- excuse me 26 people who were killed at the school. six adults and we see their names and their ages, 29, 47, 52, 30, 56, and 27. but then you see the names of the children and all of them, 20 kids, either 6 or 7 years old, charlotte, 6, daniel, 7, olivia, 6, josephine, 7, anna, 6, dylan, 6. i mean you see these names. you go down, jessica, 6, benjamin, 6. >> to see photographs that the parents are releasing. we're only sh
: beautiful. it's called chamber of commerce weather for the city of cleveland. it's snowing sideways. the snow is coming in from lake erie and every once in a while we get one of these gusts that force me to turn my back to that wind because it puts the big fat snowflakes right in our faces, but this city says they are prepared for what has already been an already dangerous and deadly storm. the middle of the country is starting to dig out from a blustery snowstorm. in waterloo, iowa, shovels and snowplows are back in use after more than eight inches of snow fell. good news for many businesses after a lackluster season a year ago. >> been delivering a lot of snow blowers, a lot of equipment has been breaking. we have been fixing equipment for people to get snow removed. >> reporter: picturesque in wisconsin, good for building snowmen but a challenge for crews clearing snow. >> the snow is really wet. a lot of buildup on the front of the plows and very hard for the snow to scour off the plows. >> reporter: storm conditions have caused havoc on a lot of roadways and left thousands of r
of ours who is a retired new york city police officer. he taught her how to shoot. she was very responsible with the gun. she was a very responsible person in general, especially in terms of safety. >> ellen, she took the boys to the shooting range. that's been talked about. she did take them to the shooting range? >> from what i understand, yep. >> and what did you want to say about that? >> again, i guess i want to j t just -- um -- um -- um -- um mickic russ as far as safety. nancy wouldn't answer her phone or look at a text in the car. if i got in the car, it was oops, seat belt, at the first dippi ding or before the ding happened. she was very careful and cautious and responsible. in regard to leaving anything out as far as a gun, it is -- i can't believe show with do the . >> sebastian, tell us your memories? >> a very dignified woman, a lot of class, very proper, great moral compass. we just saw her three weeks ago, my place, i left, accident say bye. she send embassy text zurngts say bye to me. the kind of person she was. very polite and nice to you, a really good perso
the problem in our cities and unhappily in our schools where people like you have been able to get laws put on the books that keep people from being able to defend themselves. i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it is incomprehensible. >> you're an unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to me you're morally object ob toous and team to prefer to be a victim than being able to prevail over the criminal element. i don't want why you want to be the criminal's friend. >> what a ridiculous argument. have you no coherent argument whatsoever. you don't -- >> you have no -- >> you don't give a damn about the gun murder rate in america. you don't care. >> seems to me -- >> what you would like to see, let's go through this. >> they bounce right off of you. >> okay. that's not just happening on television. that is happening across the country. so consider it a back drop to an effort that's getting under way in washington, d.c. to try to effect something constructive about guns and the violence that's just so per
better all of our communities and all of our cities and all our states so we can make everyone everywhere in this country feel safe. thank you. i would be happy to answer any questions, as long as i see them to be within reason. [ inaudible question ] >> i was leaving to work, and she woke up before i left. and i've actually been teaching her portuguese. so our last conversation was in portuguese. and she told me good morning, and asked how i was doing. and i said that i was doing well. she said that she loved me. and i gave her a kiss and i was out the door. [ inaudible question ] >> the best way that i've been seeing that is i have two really good friends at home who have set up a facebook page to help raise money for emilie. and when i've gotten on that and just seen the number of people who have commented and expressed their condolences, it's been quite overwhelming. >> can you describe what your daughter looked like for us? >> there's lots of pictures on the emilieparker fund page on facebook. she was beautiful. she was blonde, always smiling. bright blue eyes. [ inaudible question ]
of our -- of our little city center. it's very important that everybody acknowledge that. and that certain requirements are made and are met. and in this particular case, it was apparent that someone in the state department at a relatively senior level denied a request for increased security. and the problem that we should have with that is that no single authority should be allowed to make a decision to deny an enhanced security posture. you can approve that. you might find out you went overboard and maybe increased too much security. that's never a bad thing. however, you shouldn't be allowed to deny those requests. that needs to go to a larger body and it needs to go to the very top if somebody's going to deny a request of an ambassador for increased security. >> so i hear you, general. but this board also recommended no disciplinary action. named no names. shouldn't someone specific be held accountable for what you just said? >> oh, of course. i mean, you've got to start at the very top. nobody's out to -- >> so is it hillary clinton? she's at the very top. she's the
are in other cities are processing this, are going through this, and they need for us to reach out to them so the first and most important thing you can do stog find out what it is that they know about this trauma, what it is that they are thinking about, what it is that they would like to know, and then begin your discussion there instead of going into a straight dialogue or preaching to them as to what has happened and the evils of guns and so on. they may not be there yet. so be where they are, and begin that conversation with them. and secondly, and most importantly, it's not one conversation, don. you and i have talked about this before. it really is a series of conversations and it's not that you sit here and i'll sit there and let's talk, but it's about doing other activities, cooking with your kids, exercising with your kids, playing with your kids. and then bringing up these series of conversations and making sure it's interactional where they're doing a lot of the talking, you're doing a lot of the listening, but being honest with them and letting them know that this is something ve
volumes this morning as the nation and the city of newtown remembered what happened one week ago today. rain drops, only rain drops were heard during this moment of silence. firefighters there in newtown, paying tribute to the 20 children, the 6, the 7-year-olds and the seven adults gunned down, for reasons we may never know. the reflections began at 9:30 this morning eastern time. the time that first call came in to 911. at least 29 states held a moment of silence, put their flags at half-staff. parts of the internet went silent. video gamers put down their consoles in unity and bells across connecticut sounded for each killed at sandy hook elementary school. [ bells tolling ] at the episcopal church in newtown, 28 tolls rang for each life lost, including the shooter's. 28 there. when the bells were still, the remembrances began. one inside the capital building in hartford. ♪ amazing grace how sweet the sound ♪ ♪ that saved a wretch like me ♪ ♪ i once was lost but now i'm found ♪ ♪ was blind but now i see ♪ >> the first lady also marked this day in a letter to newtown.
here. >> children in newtown and cities nearby are still off of school today, but for the rest of the country, school bells rang this morning. parents and teachers still struggling, probably going to struggle for a while now. how do they explain this mass shooting at an elementary school and whether or not this could even happen at their own child's school. here's what one dad said on friday. >> my kids are already asking, when is this going to happen again? you know, it was only a week ago that we were talking about this type of situation. and i said the chances of it happening are 1 in a zillion at sandy hook. i was wrong about that. >> i'm joined again from new york by clinical psychologist jeff gardere. and jeff, we might have to interrupt you if the white house briefing starts. >> sure. >> to go to that. but in the meantime, let's talk about this. what do you say? there are kids all over the country, they're getting bits and pieces of this story. they're probably afraid. they're probably very upset. how should parents communicate and reassure them that it's okay to go to s
york city. this is the story you are talking about. it involves the giants. they wore the letters shes. the most personal tribute, involved victor cruz. the favorite player of one of the murdered children. 6-year-old jack pinto. cruz has been in contact with the pinto family and he spoke following the game along with his head coach. let's listen. >> seem like a strong family. i spoke to -- spoke to the older brother and, you know, he was distraught as well. i told them to stay strong and i will do whatever i can to honor him. >> we felt terribly about it. i'm sure the whole nation does. it is not just us. but being close to home, it did -- the players were greatly upset about it. and -- many of the players have rung children. they can empathize parents of the young children killed. >> jack pinto's funeral is this afternoon. and according to victor cruz, the family is considering burying the child in cruz's jersey. >> will victor cruz go to the funeral? >> that's -- that was the plan. i would imagine if possible he is going to attend. >> just really heartbreaking. it really is. we are a
and create another image in its place. >> you're a former new york city police officer? >> that's correct. >> how did you prepare when you were a police officer for traumatic events like this? because, brooke baldwin has been talking to the rescuers and they are very emotional. they can't believe what they saw. so how did you prepare when you were doing that? >> it is not really something you can prepare for. and really it is the -- it is in the moment. you really don't have that opportunity to deal -- to express your emotions at that -- in that moment in time. it is only afterwards really you have a chance to process it. >> i understand that yesterday you met with grief counselors at various schools. >> at the grieving center, yes. >> at the grieving center. tell us about that. >> basically i donated some books there so they had the opportunity to use that with the kids in being able to, as a tool for them to use the book that can help them cope with what's been going on. >> it is important to be here because -- >> it is important to be here. it is important, i think, to find out how you
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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